Martin Rickett/PA Wire

Stars of the stage version of Coronation Street are complaining that they have still not been paid following the collapse of the show in May, according to a report in the Guardian today.

The much-publicised 'Street of Dreams' – dubbed as the musical version of Britain's best loved soap – was pulled after just two performances, forcing the production companies into administration this week.


Amid rumours of unfinished scripts and diva behavior behind the scenes, the show was pulled after receiving poor reviews in the spring. Then came the departure of the leading lady, Katy Cavanagh, who plays Julie Carp in the ITV series.

Six months later, Cavanagh and other stars including Kym Marsh (Michelle Connor), Julie Goodyear (Bet Lynch), Paul O'Grady (Lily Savage) and Kevin Kennedy (Curly Watts) are still waiting to be paid.

However, chances of recompense look slim following news that Reckless Entertainment and Street of Dreams Ltd, two production companies behind the musical, were put into administration this week.

According to the Guardian, a judge ruled on Wednesday that the firms were insolvent and gave them until the end of January next year to find more than £2m to pay their outstanding debts. At least 20 individuals and firms are owed money.

Funding deficit
In a press statement, Adrian Hyde, one of the administrators from Chantrey Vellacott DFK, said he hoped all debts could be paid so that the show could go on. "Our appointment as administrators follows months of uncertainty and problems surrounding Street of Dreams and its Coronation Street musical. The production company has suffered from a funding deficit and lack of confidence in the venture, but with the right level of investment it is hoped that production of the show can be relaunched."

He added: "The production has been five years in the making and held two sell out nights at MEN Arena in Manchester which demonstrates the huge potential success this venture could have with new finance through a new vehicle.

"I've no doubt this production will be an extremely attractive proposition and investment opportunity, given the potential to incorporate a West End show and UK tour, and we welcome any interested parties to get in touch."

If the production companies fail to raise the necessary finance to repay debts and continue the show, the stars of the show are unlikely to receive their outstanding pay packets.