The new PJsFreud Communications

The new high-tech solution to the energy price crisis is a pair of thermal pyjamas. Asda has launched new thermals that it says will save you £300. But is there anything special about them, or is this just the sort of advice that the older generations have been passing on for decades?

And if this is the cutting edge of energy saving, what other classics should we bring back?



The PJs

The pyjamas have been launched with something of a fanfare. Asda is calling them 'self-heating pyjamas', and say they have been developing the material for years to make it particularly effective at retaining heat. The idea is that you don't just wear them at night, you use them as thermal underwear during the day too, so you can bring down your bills. And given that they cost from £5, they're not going to break the bank either.

The store claims that the thermals will keep you so warm that you can turn your central heating down by five degrees this winter - and save £300. Even if you just turn it down one degree you'll save £60. The retailer even wheels out the Energy Saving Trust to endorse this figure.

Old-fashioned tips

However, wearing extra layers is nothing new. Asda actually surveyed customers and found that 57% of people sleep in an extra jumper to stay warm, while 36% sleep under two duvets between November and February.

For decades we have used the same tricks to keep warm at home. It's only in recent years we've turned up the thermostat instead. And this isn't the only recent habit we need to cut back on if we're going to save energy, so we've come up with five of the best nostalgia-heavy ways to save energy.

1) Have a conversation

Turn off the TV, the iPad, the games consoles, and the phones and actually talk to each other for a while. If that's asking a bit much, then buy a book.

2) Turn off the Christmas lights

Do we really gain so much from the team of illuminated reindeer in the garden and having so many lights on in the house that it can be seen from space? By all means invest in a few low energy decorative lights, then let glitter, tinsel, and some candles do the rest of the work for you.

3) Invest in retro draught excluders

Bring back the retro look with a sausage dog draught excluder for any door letting in significant cold air. Add in silicone sealant for the skirting boards, filler for wooden floors, draught-proofing for breezy windows and chimney balloons and you could save £90 a year.

4) Give up the remote control

Remember the days when we used to change channels on the TV without the little black box? There was no stand-by then, so when we went to bed we'd turn it off properly, and save around £40 a year (if you do this on all your gadgets). If you're wedded to the control, then at least get up once, and turn it off before you go to bed.

5) Learn some very basic DIY skills

This is something that has died a death among the under-40s and it's responsible for an enormous amount of wasted cash. The broken cat-flap, the dripping hot tap, the flapping letter box, are all are eating cash. So parents and kids need to get together and trade a few basic skills, so incompetence around the home doesn't cost a small fortune.

But what do you think? Are thermals the cure for your cold-weather ills? What other retro tips can keep us warm this winter without breaking the bank? Share your thoughts below.



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