Woman on computerYou have to get up very early to take advantage of the speediest broadband services, new figures show.

Internet surfers in urban areas receive the fastest service at 4am, while those going online at 9pm have to make do with the slowest broadband speeds.




At this, the most popular time to be on the internet, the average broadband connection runs a massive 28% slower than at 4am. And the average download speed plummets from 14.83Mbps to 10.72Mbps as a result.

The stats, which are from comparison website uSwitch, are based on more than 2.3 million consumer speed tests taken over the past six months.

They also reveal that those living in Birmingham and Middlesbrough enjoy the fastest evening surfing, while people based in Aberdeen and Swansea experience the slowest broadband speeds across the country.

While a Birmingham resident is enjoying an evening download speed of 12.88Mbps, his friend in Aberdeen could therefore be struggling with just 6.08Mbps.

Those living in Dudley in the West Midlands are the most likely to notice their broadband speeds changing depending when they go online, though.

The difference between the broadband speeds they receive at peak and off-peak times is an incredible 60%.

Julia Stent at uSwitch said: "This research shows the incredible strain that is placed on broadband when everyone logs on at the same time, particularly in densely populated areas.

"It certainly explains why some people may never actually feel like their connection is as fast as the one promised by providers when they signed."

Obviously, getting up at - or staying awake until - 4am is not the ideal solution for all those consumers frustrated by the slow broadband speeds they receive when they want to be online.

You can, however, run a quick test to ensure that you are getting the best possible service for your area.

Stent said: "Run an online speed test at home to check that you are getting the best possible service available in your area. And if you think you could do better, consider shopping around for a new deal."



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