Lidl shopperJane Mingay/PA

Lidl is running a special offer this weekend. If you 'Like' it on Facebook, you can then download a voucher worth £5 - which you can redeem on any shop worth more than £35.

So what's the catch?


The deal

The deal runs all weekend, and you'll have until the close of business on Sunday to spend your voucher. You'll need a Facebook account and access to a printer, but then it's essentially money for nothing.

A Lidl spokesperson told AOL: "We recently reached the incredible milestone of 250,000 fans on our Facebook page and just wanted to give something back to our customers as a thank you for their support."

Reaction

Why, then, has the reception on Twitter been so lukewarm?

There have been lots of money-saving types re-tweeting the offer. It's something we suggested in today's Freebie Friday. For those who shop at Lidl in order to spend even less on their shopping it's a no-brainer.

At the time of writing one tenth of my own Facebook friends have 'liked the page', and we would urge anyone to do the same.

Negative

The negative reaction has come largely from younger users. @Jord_18 said: "Facebook just suggested that i should 'like' Lidl's page... Log out". Meanwhile ‏@saz_mataz said: "mums making me like lidl on facebook so she can get a £5 voucher, so sad oh so sad". And ‏@claretjamie said: "''Like' Lidl and receive a £5 off voucher!' - Yeah, real likely."

The trouble is that once you like the page it's in your timeline. This means that every time the company decides to tell its fans about something, you'll get messages from the discount shop. It'll also appear on the shop's page, and your friends will all be able to see that you have liked the page.

For young people, Facebook is the place to appear cool, well-connected and exciting. The last thing they want friends to see is an update showing that they've popped down to Lidl for a cut-price slanket.

Misguided

There are plenty of people in the UK who are old enough not to care who knows about their discount shopping. There are those of us who have spent through the boom time, repaid the worst credit card bills of our lives and learned a vital lesson: that there's really no point paying more than you have to for the basics.

However, those in their teens and their 20s, it seems, still have a difficult lesson to learn before they are ready to go discount shopping with pride.

But what do you think, would you mind people knowing about your discount shopping habits? Are you proud of them? Let us know in the comments.