Iceland boss Malcolm Walker says he doesn't eat own-brand value food because, well, they're rubbish and tasteless. What he actually said was that he wouldn't cook own-brand value food because it "won't contain much meat".

Even the bosses of UK supermarket chains are admitting that everyday food staples sold to the British public are junk.


"Filler"

"I wouldn't eat value supermarket products because they won't contain much meat," Walker is quoted in the Mail. "There will be other things in there, whether it's rusk or filler or whatever it is."

Walker went onto claim that supermarkets shouldn't be blamed for the horse meant contamination scandal, blaming instead penny-pinching local councils and schools for driving down costs.

However the Local Authority Caterers Association has hit back at the Iceland boss's comments, claiming Councils are opting for far healthier menu options, and that it's not all about the bottom line.

"He is very, very wrong to put the blame for all this on the local authorities to be blunt – I think it is a cop out for him to blame the local authorities," Anne Bull, the association's chair told the Telegraph.

Supply chain failure

The law is clear says Bull: it's the responsibility of the retailer and supplier to ensure "the product they sell us is what they say it is. There has been a major supply chain failure. That's not the fault of consumers, councils or hospitals."

The quality of meat sold to UK consumers is certainly getting a lot of attention. Much imported chicken, for example, sold to British restaurants comes via processing plants in Europe, heavily adulterated with chemicals. But the actual bird itself may have come from Thailand.

Some consumers will change their behaviour and opt for better quality food in future, paying extra. But there's the suspicion that supermarkets, responding, could attempt to use the opportunity to pump up prices of better quality, or organic, meat products.


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