If cash were no object, where would you live? A new survey asked 3,500 Britons and the answer was clear: South West England in a large detached Victorian house with garage plus a big garden. In contrast, the North East was picked by just 1.3% polled.

Many had little time for living in the Capital. But living the Devon dream, for instance, doesn't come cheap.


Devon dream

"The South West was the clear winner location-wise with 30% of Brits surveyed choosing it as their ideal location," says Lawrence Hall of Primelocation, "whilst 25% prefer the South East. The North East was the least-preferred location with only 1.3% of respondents selecting it as the ideal place for their dream home."

A fairly ordinary house - not even detached but a terraced cottage - in the popular seaside resort of Salcombe in Devon is currently selling on Primelocation for £1.1m. But what pushes the price of this particular property up is that it has harbour views, plus private mooring facilities.

Garage vs walk-in wardrobe

Clearly the countryside is popular for most Brits' ideal home; only 14% of those surveyed would choose to live in London with 25% opting for a rural village; 22% chose a larger country town while 17% wanted to live on the coast, so the survey claims.

Most - two thirds (66%) - saw a large garden as essential. But the gender divide was gouged open with 49% opting for a multi-car garage while 47% said a walk-in wardrobe (or several) was essential.

Any home a dream?

"Problem neighbours," says Hall, "were identified as the number one concern, with more than half (57%) of those surveyed stating that anti-social neighbours would be the biggest put-off. And more than a quarter (28%) felt that an unkempt garden would make it far less desirable."

While average UK wages are around £26,500 and salaries are still failing to rise in line with inflation, many will struggle to buy any property. Numbers of owner occupiers are decreasing while the number of private amateur landlords are rising, increasingly upping rents in line with house price inflation - making it harder to save for a deposit.