Tesco


A Tesco branch in Tiverton, Devon, has banned scantily-clad people from coming into the shop. Women will be made to cover up and men will be required to wear a shirt.

But why have they done this, and is this the first shop with a dress code?


The ban

The store was forced to issue the ban after receiving complaints from other shoppers during the recent warm spell.

According to the Mirror, Tesco said that the amount of flesh on show was embarrassing other shoppers, and that shirtless shoppers were breaching health and safety regulations, because they could drip sweat onto the produce.

A spokesperson told the Daily Mail: "As we see glimpses of the summer weather, we've decided that it's sensible to ask customers to wear t-shirts and footwear in store. We don't want them to tread on anything sharp and we want all of our customers to feel comfortable." He said the move was in response to customer complaints.

It has posted a notice in the window informing shoppers of the ban, It says: "To avoid causing offence or embarrassment to others, as well as for health and safety reasons, we ask that customers are appropriately dressed when visiting our stores. Shirts, tops and shoes must be worn at all times."

Dress codes

It's not the first store with a dress code. In fact Tesco in St Mellon, Cardiff, issued a ban on shoppers showing up in their pyjamas in 2010. The store said at the time it was in response to customer complaints.

And while there were plenty of people who were stunned that enough shoppers showed up in their pyjamas to make a dress code necessary, the awaiting media caught one being refused entry on the first day of the ban.

The most famous store with a dress code is Harrods, which introduced one in the late 1980s, outlawing beach-wear, cycling or running kit, flips flops or thong sandals, bare midriffs, or dirty clothes. It says this is to ensure shopping in the store is: "pleasurable in every respect."

It famously threw Kylie Minogue and Jason Donovan out in the early 1990s for being too scruffy, and hit the headlines in 2010 for throwing out two runners who popped in for a bottle of water mid-run.



A more recent customer dress code was implemented in the US, where banks in part of Florida have introduced rules in order to tackle a spate of recent robberies. Customers cannot enter if they are wearing a hat, hood or shades. The Florida Bankers Association said it introduced something similar five years ago, and saw the number of robberies plummet.

We have become used to pubs, restaurants and clubs operating a dress code. The question is whether more shops ought to bring them in too? What do you think? let us know in the comments.


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