JarAP Photo/Matt Rourke

66-year-old Margaret Goodwin was woken by an explosion at her flat in Henley-On-Thames at 7am on Tuesday. The door was ripped off her fridge, and flung across the kitchen, knocking a chunk out of the wall. The ceiling was lifted too, cracking the wall in the living room and porch.

And the culprit was a jar of home-made chutney.


Exploding chutney

Goodwin had received the home-made rhubarb chutney from a friend. However, the gas inside the jar fermented, releasing gases into the fridge. According to the Daily Mail, this mixed with other gases inside the fridge - which had not been opened for 12 hours.

Eventually the pressure was too much for the fridge to bear, and it blew the door off.

Goodwin didn't initially know what had caused the devastation, so called firefighters, concerned that there might be another explosion. They were baffled, and could not reach a conclusion as to the cause, until a technical director from the Housing Association traced it back to the chutney.

Goodwin told the Daily Telegraph: "You wouldn't think a little jar of rhubarb chutney could cause so much devastation."

Odd explosions

And it's not the only bizarre explosion to have hit the headlines. In December last year a 30-tonne-aquarium packed with fish, turtles and sharks, exploded at a Shanghai mall, creating waves of water across the shopping centre.

Then in May in Leqing City in China, a woman was using a public toilet when it exploded. The force was so powerful that it blew over the wall of the toilets. It was though to have been caused by faulty wiring which ignited the methane that had built up in the toilet. The woman was unharmed.

And back in May 2011 it was the turn of watermelons across eastern China. After farmers fed them too many growth chemicals during wet weather, they started exploding in fields across the region. About 20 farmers lost about 115 acres of melons - and they resorted to feeding them to pigs.


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